How to Create Legal Videos Online

At The Hayes Firm we’ve created over 500 legal videos. Needless to say, after all that time, we’ve developed a knack for getting them created, processed, and posted. I’d like to share with you some of our tips and tricks for creating good legal videos that will keep people watching.

There are three major things you need to concern yourself with when making videos.

First, the content.

Second, the hardware.

Third, the distribution.

If any of these things are lacking or missing you are not giving yourself the best opportunity for success. Let’s break down each aspect and try to develop a gameplan to achieve the best results possible.

Content For Legal Videos

When developing legal videos, there are two different schools of thought on what to discuss. The first is broad, overarching concepts that tons of people can relate to. These videos try to cut a broad swath in the hopes that more people will be searching for them on a daily basis. Some examples of topics include ‘how to find a personal injury attorney’, or ‘what is worker’s compensation’, or ‘how to sue somebody’. The good thing about these topics is that a lot of people might need that information, the bad thing is that there is already a lot of material out there covering these issues so it can be difficult to break through.

The second method of content generation is niche focused. These videos take something very specific and talk about that issue in depth. Rather than ‘how to sue somebody’, which is broad, a niche video might focus on ‘how to sue a landscape architect for faulty work’. As you can imagine, that specific scenario occurs far less often than people suing in general, but for those folks who are suing in regards to landscape architecture, you are certain to show up higher due to the limited amount of competition.

Another decision you’ll have to make is in regards to video length. It used to be thought that people’s attention span on the internet only lasted for about 2 minutes. While that’s still true in some regards, plenty of video savants have proven that long video is entirely possible. Gary Vaynerchuk of Wine Library TV puts out a video episode every day, 20-30 minutes in length, and gets hundreds of thousands of views.

When dealing with legal topics specifically, it is easy to get dry and boring. Be careful not to lecture your listeners as it is exceedingly easy to click away and watch something more captivating.

Hardware for Legal Videos

The exact model of camcorder you end up with will be up to you, but there are a few key factors that we should discuss before you make the purchase.

The first is storage style. These days camcorders can retain their footage through vhs-style mini tapes, dvds, or direct hard drives. Each come with their own benefit, but if you intend on putting your videos on the internet, the internal hard drive with an usb jack is a very good choice.

You also have to consider how important HD video quality is to you. HD cameras tend to be a lot more expensive. If you intend to make legal videos that are not terribly fancy or action intensive, then HD probably isn’t a necessity. But, again, it’s totally up to you.

Two other things to consider are mic location and battery life. Front mounted mics tend to be better at picking up the voices of individuals in front of the camera. Good battery life allows to you make more videos in a single sitting, or longer videos without having to get up and then edit out the lapse later on.

Distribution of Legal Videos

Once you have your video taped and ready to go, it’s important that you know how to get the word out.

First of all, you want to have a repository on your home page to house them. After all, if people are visiting you directly, you want to make sure they can find your videos.

Second, you want to create accounts on the biggest video sharing websites – examples include YouTube, vimeo, blip, Google, and revver.

After you’ve created those accounts, make your life easy and sign up for an account with TubeMogul. TubeMogul allows you to connect all of your accounts into one uploading website. Then, whenever you upload a video to TubeMogul, it distributes that video to all the websites you have accounts for.

Outsourcing vs. Captive Operations – Which Model is the Best Fit For Your Business?

While feasibility of using offshore/nearshore resources for the delivery of certain activities or business processes has been already established, long term strategic feasibility and appropriateness of various engagement models are still under scrutiny.

The most common approaches nowadays are either working with a third-party outsourcing provider or establishing captive operations in lower cost locations. Engagement models can be differentiated based upon customer organization’s need for management control, costs of operation, risks and other factors.

Third-party Outsourcing

Third-party outsourcing is classic client-vendor relationship governed by contractual obligations and service level agreements. It is mostly driven by tactical reasons such as short-term cost savings and staffing flexibility. Non-core or non-critical activities are typical candidates for outsourcing.

Traditional third-party outsourcing comes in two main forms:

  • Project-based outsourcing is considered to be the most appropriate for development of software with well-defined requirements and deliverables. It is suitable for irregular but on-going or one-off projects. On-site presence may be required to facilitate estimating, specification and relationship management. Typical pricing models are Time and Materials (T&M) and Fixed Price.
  • Dedicated development center model caters for software with changing requirements, maintenance and support of large systems, research and development, testing as well as other types of complex ongoing medium- or long-term tasks. In this type of engagement vendor provides necessary facilities and allocates a team that works only on account’s projects and is managed by customer representative. This option is usually preferred when resource requirements are low. The customer is charged fixed monthly fee per full-time employee (FTE).

Captive Operations

When considering how to organize the remote delivery of software development services, captive subsidiary option often does not receive full consideration in comparison to outsourcing. While it is generally accepted to outsource certain non-crucial activities, in certain cases this approach is inappropriate for core functions and critical activities. Decision to take work offshore/nearshore doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to outsource it. Use of remote resources for the delivery of functions close to core business while retaining operational control and benefiting from real cost advantages can be achieved by means of setting up captive facility, thus keeping work within the company.

Captive model means that customer organization makes strategic decision to create its presence in the lower cost location and conduct work there as a part of its own operations. The activities are performed remotely, but they are not outsourced to the vendor. Thus the customer is able to retain full control and mitigate respective risks associated with intellectual property and other sensitive business information.

Organizations that want to establish captive centers have similar goals as those deploying traditional enterprise or shared services operations. In the first place captives are supposed to lower cost through labor arbitrage. But recent research shows that buyers are seeking not only cheaper but skilled labor at offshore/nearshore locations. They want to obtain competitive advantage and gains from process improvements. In order to avoid risks of underutilizing captive capacities, organizations must thoroughly assess their long-term operational requirements and predict service needs that may arise in the future.

The most common approaches to setting up captive operations are the following:

  • Creating captive center from scratch (do-it-yourself captive) can be successful when customer organization has necessary resources, local expertise and market knowledge. Decision to set up own captive center may evolve organically through growth. Organization can either perform extensive due diligence on its own or buy existing company with operations in the chosen location.
  • Build-Operate-Transfer (BOT) approach means partnering with third-party vendor to establish and stabilize center. Vendor is responsible for initial setup, staffing and operations of the captive center during the predefined period of time. At the end of the contract period the ownership is transferred to the customer. Thus organization takes over the turnkey captive center tailored to its specific needs. BOT option best suits organizations that do not have local expertise or extensive resources available. In this type of engagement only logistics associated with setup of the captive center is outsourced. Build-Operate-Transfer optimally combines control element of the pure captive model with flexibility of outsourcing. Essentially it provides maximum control at minimal risk.

Main benefits of having own captive center:

  • Ongoing realization of real cost savings
  • Full operational control and monitoring
  • Full ownership after the transfer
  • Minimization of intellectual property and data security risks
  • Retained knowledge of industry, specific business processes and techniques
  • Improved communications by continual reinforcement and experience
  • Easy replication of parent organization’s processes
  • Captive center can be commercialized at some point in the future

Both outsourcing and captive operations have similar driving forces (cost reductions and competitive pressures in the first place) and particular advantages, but main factors for choosing one or another vary.

Both approaches will deliver benefits in terms of improved focus, optimization of processes, reduction of operational costs, faster time-to-market etc. But companies must thoroughly evaluate each option to identify one that represents the best fit for their specific requirements, business culture and strategic goals.

The approach selected will depend on whether the primary driver is short-term cost savings or whether the company has long-term vision for offshoring/nearshoring and wishes to retain control over processes and intellectual property.

Establishing nearshore captive center in Ukraine through BOT model

If software development is a core competency of your company and you have long term specialized resource requirements, it makes sense to build your own capability in order to support the full software life-cycle, secure intellectual property and build up specific know-how. Nowadays this process is not as difficult as it used to be. The key to success is finding a trusted partner that already operates in the environment of country. By doing this you will benefit from:

  • Clearly defined setup methodology and timeline
  • Planned step-by-step implementation
  • Responsibility for all logistics associated with establishing a captive center
  • Practical knowledge of establishing IT business and dealing with related legal and contractual issues
  • Deep comprehension of cost and effort components associated with setting up and running a software development center in offshore/nearshore country
  • Hands-on experience in software engineering, generally recognized methodologies, processes and quality assurance that can be adapted to captive center
  • Established HR practices, experience in recruiting qualified IT staff
  • Attention to addressing security and business continuity issues
  • Consulting and support throughout the setup process
  • High level of business commitment and responsiveness
  • Flexible client-specific approach

Outsourcing, Captives, and BOTs, Oh My!

The Challenge:

Skills are critical, capacity is needed, costs are important, but what’s right for your business? There are different models out there that can provide strategic or tactical resources to your company. Depending on your objectives, one model can provide a much better value to your business than others.

So, where should you begin? The first place is get clear on your objectives and desired results. Are you trying to fill skill shortages, improve your capacity, improve your cost base, or all three? Are the resources you seeking part of the core competency you bring to the market? By thinking of these questions as you review the options, the answer will become clear.

Captive or Hybrid:

If the need is strategic and impacts your core competency, it is important that you maintain control over the resources. Partnering with another company may be viable, but you should not partner with another company if it has the same core competency as you. The reason, you invite a possible competitor into your business and customer base.

So what is the alternative? A captive or hybrid captive operations allows you to select and manage a team that will add to your core competency and maintain control. In many if not all respects, the staff are your employees, managed by you.

Hybrid captive models take away many of the traditional risks of going to another country A hybrid model provides the recruiting of talent and other human resource management services, while at a lower cost than an outsourcer or BOT arrangement.

Hybrid captive services include locating or providing facilities and managing them. Often, there is no lease commitment, reducing the risk of being tied to a long term rental agreement. The model typically provide an option to go to a full captive arrangement, setting up your own legal entity, your own lease or purchase of facilities, and the transfer of all employees as part of the process for a fee.

Outsourcing:

If the need is not strategic or it is not part of the core competency of your business, outsourcing may provide a very good alternative. A good example where this has worked for many companies is marketing. Marketing is important to your business, but for many companies, it may not be a core competency or skill within your company. Finding a strong partner could have a very positive impact to your business while not putting your core business, competency or customer base as risk.

Typically, an outsourcer has staff on hand or bench. This provides both a benefit and a cost to you since you pay them to have and maintain extra resources. The model typically does not allow you to have control over which personnel will be assigned to you or how long they will stay working with you.

Like a hybrid captive model, outsourcing does provide the advantages of not having to deal with the human resource risks such as employment laws, benefits, hiring, and firing of employees. It also does not require the need to directly lease or own facilities as all these costs are part of the outsourcer’s fees.

BOT:

If the need is more strategic and the desire is to postpone the management of a team, in theory a BOT may provide a good solution. A BOT is a build, operate, and transfer operation. In many respects, a BOT is an outsourcing relationship, with the intent to transfer the operation as some future time. The idea is to provide you with a choice of the team you will have working with you. It is worth noting that in a very high percentage of the time, the transfer never takes place.

In the case of BOT’s, there are typically more risks that are part of the model. Depending on the approach, you may be required to sign up for facility leases, facilities management and other services.

Keys:

So what is the right choice? It comes back to your needs and objectives. If it is non-strategic or tactical, outsourcing may be a good option. If it is strategic and part of your core competency, a hybrid or captive is the best choice. If it is something in between, a BOT may provide a good alternative.

In all cases, it is important to understand that it will take time and commitment from your team. Using global resources can fill skill shortages, provide capacity, and even lower costs, but it does not come without effort.